Yet Another Blog in Statistical Computing

I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies but not the madness of people. -Isaac Newton

Archive for the ‘Loss Forecasting’ Category

Estimating Parameters of A Hyper-Poisson Distribution in SAS

Similar to COM-Poisson, Double-Poisson, and Generalized Poisson distributions discussed in my previous post (https://statcompute.wordpress.com/2016/11/27/more-about-flexible-frequency-models/), the Hyper-Poisson distribution is another extension of the standard Poisson and is able to accommodate both under-dispersion and over-dispersion that are common in real-world problems. Given the complexity of parameterization and computation, the Hyper-Poisson is somewhat under-investigated. To the best of my knowledge, there is no off-shelf computing routine in SAS for the Hyper-Poisson distribution and only a R function available in http://www4.ujaen.es/~ajsaez/hp.fit.r written by A.J. Sáez-Castillo and A. Conde-Sánchez (2013).

The SAS code presented below is the starting point of my attempt on the Hyper-Poisson and its potential applications. The purpose is to replicate the calculation result shown in the Table 6 of “On the Hyper-Poisson Distribution and its Generalization with Applications” by Bayo H. Lawal (2017) (http://www.journalrepository.org/media/journals/BJMCS_6/2017/Mar/Lawal2132017BJMCS32184.pdf). As a result, the parameterization employed in my SAS code will closely follow Bayo H. Lawal (2017) instead of A.J. Sáez-Castillo and A. Conde-Sánchez (2013).


data d1;
  input y n @@;
datalines;
0 121 1 85 2 19 3 1 4 0 5 0 6 1
;
run;

data df;
  set d1;
  where n > 0;
  do i = 1 to n;
    output;
  end;
run;

proc nlmixed data = df;
  parms lambda = 1 beta = 1;
  theta = 1;
  do k = 1 to 100;
    theta = theta + gamma(beta) * (lambda ** k) / gamma(beta + k);
  end;
  prob = (gamma(beta) / gamma(beta + y)) * ((lambda ** y) / theta);
  ll = log(prob);
  model y ~ general(ll);
run;

/*
                     Standard
Parameter  Estimate     Error    DF  t Value  Pr > |t|   Alpha
lambda       0.3752    0.1178   227     3.19    0.0016    0.05
beta         0.5552    0.2266   227     2.45    0.0150    0.05 
*/

As shown, the estimated Lambda = 0.3752 and the estimated Beta = 0.5552 are identical to what is presented in the paper. The next step is be to explore applications in the frequency modeling as well as its value in business cases.

HP

Advertisements

Written by statcompute

February 4, 2018 at 3:22 pm

Modeling LGD with Proportional Odds Model

The LGD model is an important component in the expected loss calculation. In https://statcompute.wordpress.com/2015/11/01/quasi-binomial-model-in-sas, I discussed how to model LGD with the quasi-binomial regression that is simple and makes no distributional assumption.

In the real-world LGD data, we usually would observe 3 ordered categories of values, including 0, 1, and in-betweens. In cases with a nontrivial number of 0 and 1 values, the ordered logit model, which is also known as Proportional Odds model, can be applicable. In the demonstration below, I will show how we can potentially use the proportional odds model in the LGD model development.

First of all, we need to categorize all numeric LGD values into three ordinal categories. As shown below, there are more than 30% of 0 and 1 values.

df <- read.csv("lgd.csv")
df$lgd <- round(1 - df$Recovery_rate, 4)
df$lgd_cat <- cut(df$lgd, breaks = c(-Inf, 0, 0.9999, Inf), labels = c("L", "M", "H"), ordered_result = T)
summary(df$lgd_cat)

#   L    M    H 
# 730 1672  143 

The estimation of a proportional odds model is straightforward with clm() in the ordinal package or polr() in the MASS package. As demonstrated below, in addition to the coefficient for LTV, there are 2 intercepts to differentiate 3 categories.

m1 <- ordinal::clm(lgd_cat ~ LTV, data = df)
summary(m1)

#Coefficients:
#    Estimate Std. Error z value Pr(>|z|)    
#LTV   2.0777     0.1267    16.4   <2e-16 ***
#---
#Signif. codes:  0 '***' 0.001 '**' 0.01 '*' 0.05 '.' 0.1 ' ' 1
#
#Threshold coefficients:
#    Estimate Std. Error z value
#L|M  0.38134    0.08676   4.396
#M|H  4.50145    0.14427  31.201

It is important to point out that, in a proportional odds model, it is the cumulative probability that is derived from the linear combination of model variables. For instance, the cumulative probability of LGD belonging to L or M is formulated as

Prob(LGD <= M) = Exp(4.50 – 2.08 * LTV) / (1 + Exp(4.50 – 2.08 * LTV))

Likewise, we would have

Prob(LGD <= L) = Exp(0.38 – 2.08 * LTV) / (1 + Exp(0.38 – 2.08 * LTV))

With above cumulative probabilities, then we can calculate the probability of each category as below.

Prob(LGD = L) = Prob(LGD <= L)
Prob(LGD = M) = Prob(LGD <= M) – Prob(LGD <= L)
Prob(LGD = H) = 1 – Prob(LGD <= M)

The R code is showing the detailed calculation how to convert cumulative probabilities to probabilities of interest.

cumprob_L <- exp(df$LTV * (-m1$beta) + m1$Theta[1]) / (1 + exp(df$LTV * (-m1$beta) + m1$Theta[1])) 
cumprob_M <- exp(df$LTV * (-m1$beta) + m1$Theta[2]) / (1 + exp(df$LTV * (-m1$beta) + m1$Theta[2])) 
prob_L <- cumprob_L
prob_M <- cumprob_M - cumprob_L
prob_H <- 1 - cumprob_M
pred <- data.frame(prob_L, prob_M, prob_H)
apply(pred, 2, mean)

#    prob_L     prob_M     prob_H 
#0.28751210 0.65679888 0.05568903 

After predicting the probability of each category, we would need another sub-model to estimate the conditional LGD for lgd_cat = “M” with either Beta or Simplex regression. (See https://statcompute.wordpress.com/2014/10/27/flexible-beta-modeling and https://statcompute.wordpress.com/2014/02/02/simplex-model-in-r) The final LGD prediction can be formulated as

E(LGD|X)
= Prob(Y = 0|X) * E(Y|X, Y = 0) + Prob(Y = 1|X) * E(Y|X, Y = 1) + Prob(0 < Y < 1|X) * E(Y|X, 0 < Y < 1)
= Prob(Y = 1|X) + Prob(0 < Y < 1|X) * E(Y|X, 0 < Y < 1)

where E(Y|X, 0 < Y < 1) can be calculated from the sub-model.

Written by statcompute

January 28, 2018 at 2:39 am

Model Non-Negative Numeric Outcomes with Zeros

As mentioned in the previous post (https://statcompute.wordpress.com/2017/06/29/model-operational-loss-directly-with-tweedie-glm/), we often need to model non-negative numeric outcomes with zeros in the operational loss model development. Tweedie GLM provides a convenient interface to model non-negative losses directly by assuming that aggregated losses are the Poisson sum of Gamma outcomes, which however might not be well supported empirically from the data generation standpoint.

In examples below, we demonstrated another flexible option, namely Zero-Adjusted (ZA) models, in both scenarios of modeling non-negative numeric outcomes, one with a small number of zeros and the other with a large number of zeros. The basic idea of ZA models is very intuitive and similar to the concept of Hurdle models for count outcomes. In a nutshell, non-negative numeric outcomes can be considered two data generation processes, one for point-mass at zeros and the other governed by a statistical distribution for positive outcomes. The latter could be either Gamma or Inverse Gaussian.

First of all, we sampled down an auto-claim data in a way that only 10 claims are zeros and the rest are all positive. While 10 is an arbitrary choice in the example, other small numbers should show similar results.

pkgs <- list("cplm", "gamlss", "MLmetrics")
lapply(pkgs, require, character.only = T)

data(AutoClaim, package = "cplm")
df1 <- na.omit(AutoClaim)

# SMALL NUMBER OF ZEROS
set.seed(2017)
smp <- sample(seq(nrow(df1[df1$CLM_AMT == 0, ])), size = 10, replace = FALSE)
df2 <- rbind(df1[df1$CLM_AMT > 0, ], df1[df1$CLM_AMT == 0, ][smp, ])

Next, we applied both Tweedie and zero-adjusted Gamma (ZAGA) models to the data with only 10 zero outcomes. It is worth mentioning that ZAGA doesn’t have to be overly complex in this case. As shown below, while we estimated the Gamma Mu parameter with model attributes, the Nu parameter to separate zeros is just a constant with the intercept = -5.4. Both Tweedie and GAZA models gave very similar estimated parameters and predictive measures with MAPE = 0.61.

tw <- cpglm(CLM_AMT ~ BLUEBOOK + NPOLICY, data = df2)
#              Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept) 8.194e+00  7.234e-02 113.277  < 2e-16 ***
# BLUEBOOK    2.047e-05  3.068e-06   6.671 3.21e-11 ***
# NPOLICY     7.274e-02  3.102e-02   2.345   0.0191 *  

MAPE(df2$CLM_AMT, fitted(tw))
# 0.6053669

zaga0 <- gamlss(CLM_AMT ~ BLUEBOOK + NPOLICY, data = df2, family = "ZAGA")
# Mu Coefficients:
#              Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept) 8.203e+00  4.671e-02 175.629  < 2e-16 ***
# BLUEBOOK    2.053e-05  2.090e-06   9.821  < 2e-16 ***
# NPOLICY     6.948e-02  2.057e-02   3.377 0.000746 ***
# Nu Coefficients:
#             Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept)  -5.3886     0.3169     -17   <2e-16 ***

MAPE(df2$CLM_AMT, (1 - fitted(zaga0, what = "nu")) * fitted(zaga0, what = "mu"))
# 0.6053314

In the next case, we used the full data with a large number of zeros in the response and then applied both Tweedie and ZAGA models again. However, in ZAGA model, we estimated two sub-models this time, one for the Nu parameter to separate zeros from non-zeros and the other for the Mu parameter to model non-zero outcomes. As shown below, ZAGA outperformed Tweedie in terms of MAPE due to the advantage that ZAGA is able to explain two data generation schemes separately with different model attributes, which is the capability beyond what Tweedie can provide.

# LARGE NUMBER OF ZEROS
tw <- cpglm(CLM_AMT ~ BLUEBOOK + NPOLICY + CLM_FREQ5 + MVR_PTS + INCOME, data = df1)
#               Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept)  6.854e+00  1.067e-01  64.241  < 2e-16 ***
# BLUEBOOK     1.332e-05  4.495e-06   2.963  0.00305 ** 
# NPOLICY      4.380e-02  3.664e-02   1.195  0.23196    
# CLM_FREQ5    2.064e-01  2.937e-02   7.026 2.29e-12 ***
# MVR_PTS      1.066e-01  1.510e-02   7.063 1.76e-12 ***
# INCOME      -4.606e-06  8.612e-07  -5.348 9.12e-08 ***

MAPE(df1$CLM_AMT, fitted(tw))
# 1.484484

zaga1 <- gamlss(CLM_AMT ~ BLUEBOOK + NPOLICY, nu.formula = ~(CLM_FREQ5 + MVR_PTS + INCOME), data = df1, family = "ZAGA")
# Mu Coefficients:
#              Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept) 8.203e+00  4.682e-02 175.218  < 2e-16 ***
# BLUEBOOK    2.053e-05  2.091e-06   9.816  < 2e-16 ***
# NPOLICY     6.948e-02  2.067e-02   3.362 0.000778 ***
# Nu Coefficients:
#               Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept)  1.153e+00  5.077e-02   22.72   <2e-16 ***
# CLM_FREQ5   -3.028e-01  2.283e-02  -13.26   <2e-16 ***
# MVR_PTS     -1.509e-01  1.217e-02  -12.41   <2e-16 ***
# INCOME       7.285e-06  6.269e-07   11.62   <2e-16 ***

MAPE(df1$CLM_AMT, (1 - fitted(zaga1, what = "nu")) * fitted(zaga1, what = "mu"))
# 1.470228

Given the great flexibility of ZA models, we also have the luxury to explore other candidates than ZAGA. For instance, if the positive part of non-negative outcomes demonstrates a high variance, we can also try a zero-inflated Inverse Gaussian (ZAIG) model, as shown below.

zaig1 <- gamlss(CLM_AMT ~ BLUEBOOK + NPOLICY, nu.formula = ~(CLM_FREQ5 + MVR_PTS + INCOME), data = df1, family = "ZAIG")
# Mu Coefficients:
#              Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)    
# (Intercept) 8.205e+00  5.836e-02 140.591  < 2e-16 ***
# BLUEBOOK    2.163e-05  2.976e-06   7.268 3.97e-13 ***
# NPOLICY     5.898e-02  2.681e-02   2.200   0.0278 *  
# Nu Coefficients:
#               Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(>|t|)
# (Intercept)  1.153e+00  5.077e-02   22.72   <2e-16 ***
# CLM_FREQ5   -3.028e-01  2.283e-02  -13.26   <2e-16 ***
# MVR_PTS     -1.509e-01  1.217e-02  -12.41   <2e-16 ***
# INCOME       7.285e-06  6.269e-07   11.62   <2e-16 ***

MAPE(df1$CLM_AMT, (1 - fitted(zaig1, what = "nu")) * fitted(zaig1, what = "mu"))
# 1.469236

Written by statcompute

September 17, 2017 at 7:26 pm

Model Operational Losses with Copula Regression

In the previous post (https://statcompute.wordpress.com/2017/06/29/model-operational-loss-directly-with-tweedie-glm), it has been explained why we should consider modeling operational losses for non-material UoMs directly with Tweedie models. However, for material UoMs with significant losses, it is still beneficial to model the frequency and the severity separately.

In the prevailing modeling practice for operational losses, it is often convenient to assume a functional independence between frequency and severity models, which might not be the case empirically. For instance, in the economic downturn, both the frequency and the severity of consumer frauds might tend to increase simultaneously. With the independence assumption, while we can argue that same variables could be included in both frequency and severity models and therefore induce a certain correlation, the frequency-severity dependence and the its contribution to the loss distribution might be overlooked.

In the context of Copula, the distribution of operational losses can be considered a joint distribution determined by both marginal distributions and a parameter measuring the dependence between marginals, of which marginal distributions can be Poisson for the frequency and Gamma for the severity. Depending on the dependence structure in the data, various copula functions might be considered. For instance, a product copula can be used to describe the independence. In the example shown below, a Gumbel copula is considered given that it is often used to describe the positive dependence on the right tail, e.g. high severity and high frequency. For details, the book “Copula Modeling” by Trivedi and Zimmer is a good reference to start with.

In the demonstration, we simulated both frequency and severity measures driven by the same set of co-variates. Both are positively correlated with the Kendall’s tau = 0.5 under the assumption of Gumbel copula.

library(CopulaRegression)
# number of observations to simulate
n <- 100
# seed value for the simulation
set.seed(2017)
# design matrices with a constant column
X <- cbind(rep(1, n), runif(n), runif(n))
# define coefficients for both Poisson and Gamma regressions
p_beta <- g_beta <- c(3, -2, 1)
# define the Gamma dispersion
delta <- 1
# define the Kendall's tau
tau <- 0.5
# copula parameter based on tau
theta <- 1 / (1 - tau)
# define the Gumbel Copula 
family <- 4
# simulate outcomes
out <- simulate_regression_data(n, g_beta, p_beta, X, X, delta, tau, family, zt = FALSE)
G <- out[, 1]
P <- out[, 2]

After the simulation, a Copula regression is estimated with Poisson and Gamma marginals for the frequency and the severity respectively. As shown in the model estimation, estimated parameters with related inferences are different between independent and dependent assumptions.

m <- copreg(G, P, X, family = 4, sd.error = TRUE, joint = TRUE, zt = FALSE)
coef <- c("_CONST", "X1", "X2")
cols <- c("ESTIMATE", "STD. ERR", "Z-VALUE")
g_est <- cbind(m$alpha, m$sd.alpha, m$alpha / m$sd.alpha)
p_est <- cbind(m$beta, m$sd.beta, m$beta / m$sd.beta)
g_est0 <- cbind(m$alpha0, m$sd.alpha0, m$alpha0 / m$sd.alpha0)
p_est0 <- cbind(m$beta0, m$sd.beta0, m$beta0 / m$sd.beta0)
rownames(g_est) <- rownames(g_est0) <- rownames(p_est) <- rownames(p_est0) <- coef
colnames(g_est) <- colnames(g_est0) <- colnames(p_est) <- colnames(p_est0) <- cols

# estimated coefficients for the Gamma regression assumed dependence 
print(g_est)
#          ESTIMATE  STD. ERR   Z-VALUE
# _CONST  2.9710512 0.2303651 12.897141
# X1     -1.8047627 0.2944627 -6.129003
# X2      0.9071093 0.2995218  3.028526

# estimated coefficients for the Gamma regression assumed dependence 
print(p_est)
#         ESTIMATE   STD. ERR   Z-VALUE
# _CONST  2.954519 0.06023353  49.05107
# X1     -1.967023 0.09233056 -21.30414
# X2      1.025863 0.08254870  12.42736

# estimated coefficients for the Gamma regression assumed independence 
# should be identical to GLM() outcome
print(g_est0)
#         ESTIMATE  STD. ERR   Z-VALUE
# _CONST  3.020771 0.2499246 12.086727
# X1     -1.777570 0.3480328 -5.107478
# X2      0.905527 0.3619011  2.502140

# estimated coefficients for the Gamma regression assumed independence 
# should be identical to GLM() outcome
print(p_est0)
#         ESTIMATE   STD. ERR   Z-VALUE
# _CONST  2.939787 0.06507502  45.17536
# X1     -2.010535 0.10297887 -19.52376
# X2      1.088269 0.09334663  11.65837

If we compare conditional loss distributions under different dependence assumptions, it shows that the predicted loss with Copula regression tends to have a fatter right tail and therefore should be considered more conservative.

df <- data.frame(g = G, p = P, x1 = X[, 2], x2 = X[, 3])
glm_p <- glm(p ~ x1 + x2, data = df, family = poisson(log))
glm_g <- glm(g ~ x1 + x2, data = df, family = Gamma(log))
loss_dep <- predict(m, X, X, independence = FALSE)[3][[1]][[1]]
loss_ind <- fitted(glm_p) * fitted(glm_g)
den <- data.frame(loss = c(loss_dep, loss_ind), lines = rep(c("DEPENDENCE", "INDEPENDENCE"), each = n))
ggplot(den, aes(x = loss, fill = lines)) + geom_density(alpha = 0.5)

loss2

Written by statcompute

August 20, 2017 at 5:22 pm

Prediction Intervals for Poisson Regression

Different from the confidence interval that is to address the uncertainty related to the conditional mean, the prediction interval is to accommodate the additional uncertainty associated with prediction errors. As a result, the prediction interval is always wider than the confidence interval in a regression model. In the context of risk modeling, the prediction interval is often used to address the potential model risk due to aforementioned uncertainties.

While calculating prediction interval of OLS regression based on the Gaussian distributional assumption is relatively straightforward with the off-shelf solution in R, it could be more complicated in a Generalized Linear Model, e.g. Poisson regression. In this post, I am going to show two empirical methods, one based on bootstrapping and the other based on simulation, calculating the prediction interval of a Poisson regression. Because of the high computing cost, the parallelism with foreach() function will be used to improve the efficiency.

First of all, let’s estimate a Poisson regression with glm() and generate a couple fake new data points to calculate model predictions. Since the toy data is very small with only 32 records with all categorical predictors, I doubled the sample size by rbind() to ensure the appropriate data coverage in the bootstrapping.

pkgs <- c('doParallel', 'foreach')
lapply(pkgs, require, character.only = T)
registerDoParallel(cores = 4)

data(AutoCollision, package = "insuranceData")
df <- rbind(AutoCollision, AutoCollision)
mdl <- glm(Claim_Count ~ Age + Vehicle_Use, data = df, family = poisson(link = "log"))
new_fake <- df[1:5, 1:2]

The first method shown below is based on the bootstrapping with following steps:

1. Bootstrapped the original model development sample by the random sample with replacements;

2. Repeated the above many times, e.g. 1000, to generate different bootstrapped samples;

3. Refitted models with bootstrapped samples;

4. Generated predictions with new data points, e.g. “new_fake”, but with refitted models;

5. Generated random numbers based on Poisson distribution with the mean, e.g. lambda, equal to the predicted values from refitted models

6. Collected all Poisson random numbers from the previous step and calculated the percentiles.

boot_pi <- function(model, pdata, n, p) {
  odata <- model$data
  lp <- (1 - p) / 2
  up <- 1 - lp
  set.seed(2016)
  seeds <- round(runif(n, 1, 1000), 0)
  boot_y <- foreach(i = 1:n, .combine = rbind) %dopar% {
    set.seed(seeds[i])
    bdata <- odata[sample(seq(nrow(odata)), size = nrow(odata), replace = TRUE), ]
    bpred <- predict(update(model, data = bdata), type = "response", newdata = pdata)
    rpois(length(bpred), lambda = bpred)
  }
  boot_ci <- t(apply(boot_y, 2, quantile, c(lp, up)))
  return(data.frame(pred = predict(model, newdata = pdata, type = "response"), lower = boot_ci[, 1], upper = boot_ci[, 2]))
}

boot_pi(mdl, new_fake, 1000, 0.95)
#      pred lower upper
#1 12.63040     6    21
#2 38.69738    25    55
#3 26.97271    16    39
#4 10.69951     4    18
#5 52.50839    35    70

The second method is based on the simulation and outlined as below:

1. Re-produced the model response variable, e.g. Claim_Count, by simulating Poisson random numbers with lambda equal to predicted values from the original model;

2. Repeated the above simulations many times, e.g. 1000, to generate many response series;

3. Generated 1000 updated model samples by replacing the original response with the new response generated from simulations;

4. Refitted models with these updated samples

5. Generated predictions with new data points, e.g. “new_fake”, but with refitted models;

6. Generated Poisson random numbers with lambda equal to the predicted values from refitted models

7. Collected all Poisson random numbers from the previous step and calculated the percentiles.

sim_pi <- function(model, pdata, n, p) {
  odata <- model$data
  yhat <- predict(model, type = "response")
  lp <- (1 - p) / 2
  up <- 1 - lp
  set.seed(2016)
  seeds <- round(runif(n, 1, 1000), 0)
  sim_y <- foreach(i = 1:n, .combine = rbind) %dopar% {
    set.seed(seeds[i])
    sim_y <- rpois(length(yhat), lambda = yhat)
    sdata <- data.frame(y = sim_y, odata[names(model$x)])
    refit <- glm(y ~ ., data = sdata, family = poisson)
    bpred <- predict(refit, type = "response", newdata = pdata)
    rpois(length(bpred),lambda = bpred)
  }
  sim_ci <- t(apply(sim_y, 2, quantile, c(lp, up)))
  return(data.frame(pred = predict(model, newdata = pdata, type = "response"), lower = sim_ci[, 1], upper = sim_ci[, 2]))
}

sim_pi(mdl, new_fake, 1000, 0.95)
#      pred lower upper
#1 12.63040     6    21
#2 38.69738    26    52
#3 26.97271    17    39
#4 10.69951     4    18
#5 52.50839    38    68

As demonstrated above, after a large number of replications, outcomes from both methods are highly consistent.

Written by statcompute

December 20, 2015 at 2:54 pm

Modeling Frequency in Operational Losses with Python

Poisson and Negative Binomial regressions are two popular approaches to model frequency measures in the operational loss and can be implemented in Python with the statsmodels package as below:

In [1]: import pandas as pd

In [2]: import statsmodels.api as sm

In [3]: import statsmodels.formula.api as smf

In [4]: df = pd.read_csv(&quot;AutoCollision.csv&quot;)

In [5]: # FITTING A POISSON REGRESSION

In [6]: poisson = smf.glm(formula = &quot;Claim_Count ~ Age + Vehicle_Use&quot;, data = df, family = sm.families.Poisson(sm.families.links.log))

In [7]: poisson.fit().summary()
Out[7]:
&lt;class 'statsmodels.iolib.summary.Summary'&gt;
&quot;&quot;&quot;
                 Generalized Linear Model Regression Results
==============================================================================
Dep. Variable:            Claim_Count   No. Observations:                   32
Model:                            GLM   Df Residuals:                       21
Model Family:                 Poisson   Df Model:                           10
Link Function:                    log   Scale:                             1.0
Method:                          IRLS   Log-Likelihood:                -204.40
Date:                Tue, 08 Dec 2015   Deviance:                       184.72
Time:                        20:31:27   Pearson chi2:                     184.
No. Iterations:                     9
=============================================================================================
                                coef    std err          z      P&gt;|z|      [95.0% Conf. Int.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intercept                     2.3702      0.110     21.588      0.000         2.155     2.585
Age[T.21-24]                  1.4249      0.118     12.069      0.000         1.193     1.656
Age[T.25-29]                  2.3465      0.111     21.148      0.000         2.129     2.564
Age[T.30-34]                  2.5153      0.110     22.825      0.000         2.299     2.731
Age[T.35-39]                  2.5821      0.110     23.488      0.000         2.367     2.798
Age[T.40-49]                  3.2247      0.108     29.834      0.000         3.013     3.437
Age[T.50-59]                  3.0019      0.109     27.641      0.000         2.789     3.215
Age[T.60+]                    2.6391      0.110     24.053      0.000         2.424     2.854
Vehicle_Use[T.DriveLong]      0.9246      0.036     25.652      0.000         0.854     0.995
Vehicle_Use[T.DriveShort]     1.2856      0.034     37.307      0.000         1.218     1.353
Vehicle_Use[T.Pleasure]       0.1659      0.041      4.002      0.000         0.085     0.247
=============================================================================================
&quot;&quot;&quot;

In [8]: # FITTING A NEGATIVE BINOMIAL REGRESSION

In [9]: nbinom = smf.glm(formula = &quot;Claim_Count ~ Age + Vehicle_Use&quot;, data = df, family = sm.families.NegativeBinomial(sm.families.links.log))

In [10]: nbinom.fit().summary()
Out[10]:
&lt;class 'statsmodels.iolib.summary.Summary'&gt;
&quot;&quot;&quot;
                 Generalized Linear Model Regression Results
==============================================================================
Dep. Variable:            Claim_Count   No. Observations:                   32
Model:                            GLM   Df Residuals:                       21
Model Family:        NegativeBinomial   Df Model:                           10
Link Function:                    log   Scale:                 0.0646089484752
Method:                          IRLS   Log-Likelihood:                -198.15
Date:                Tue, 08 Dec 2015   Deviance:                       1.4436
Time:                        20:31:27   Pearson chi2:                     1.36
No. Iterations:                    11
=============================================================================================
                                coef    std err          z      P&gt;|z|      [95.0% Conf. Int.]
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Intercept                     2.2939      0.153     14.988      0.000         1.994     2.594
Age[T.21-24]                  1.4546      0.183      7.950      0.000         1.096     1.813
Age[T.25-29]                  2.4133      0.183     13.216      0.000         2.055     2.771
Age[T.30-34]                  2.5636      0.183     14.042      0.000         2.206     2.921
Age[T.35-39]                  2.6259      0.183     14.384      0.000         2.268     2.984
Age[T.40-49]                  3.2408      0.182     17.760      0.000         2.883     3.598
Age[T.50-59]                  2.9717      0.183     16.283      0.000         2.614     3.329
Age[T.60+]                    2.6404      0.183     14.463      0.000         2.283     2.998
Vehicle_Use[T.DriveLong]      0.9480      0.128      7.408      0.000         0.697     1.199
Vehicle_Use[T.DriveShort]     1.3402      0.128     10.480      0.000         1.090     1.591
Vehicle_Use[T.Pleasure]       0.3265      0.128      2.548      0.011         0.075     0.578
=============================================================================================
&quot;&quot;&quot;

Although Quasi-Poisson regressions is not currently supported by the statsmodels package, we are still able to estimate the model with the rpy2 package by using R in the back-end. As shown in the output below, parameter estimates in Quasi-Poisson model are identical to the ones in standard Poisson model. In case that we want a flexible model approach for frequency measures in the operational loss forecast without pursuing more complex Negative Binomial model, Quasi-Poisson regression can be considered a serious contender.

In [11]: # FITTING A QUASI-POISSON REGRESSION

In [12]: import rpy2.robjects as ro

In [13]: from rpy2.robjects import pandas2ri

In [14]: pandas2ri.activate()

In [15]: rdf = pandas2ri.py2ri_pandasdataframe(df)

In [16]: qpoisson = ro.r.glm('Claim_Count ~ Age + Vehicle_Use', data = rdf, family = ro.r('quasipoisson(link = &quot;log&quot;)'))

In [17]: print ro.r.summary(qpoisson)

Coefficients:
                      Estimate Std. Error t value Pr(&gt;|t|)
(Intercept)             2.3702     0.3252   7.288 3.55e-07 ***
Age21-24                1.4249     0.3497   4.074 0.000544 ***
Age25-29                2.3465     0.3287   7.140 4.85e-07 ***
Age30-34                2.5153     0.3264   7.705 1.49e-07 ***
Age35-39                2.5821     0.3256   7.929 9.49e-08 ***
Age40-49                3.2247     0.3202  10.072 1.71e-09 ***
Age50-59                3.0019     0.3217   9.331 6.42e-09 ***
Age60+                  2.6391     0.3250   8.120 6.48e-08 ***
Vehicle_UseDriveLong    0.9246     0.1068   8.660 2.26e-08 ***
Vehicle_UseDriveShort   1.2856     0.1021  12.595 2.97e-11 ***
Vehicle_UsePleasure     0.1659     0.1228   1.351 0.191016
---
Signif. codes:  0 ‘***’ 0.001 ‘**’ 0.01 ‘*’ 0.05 ‘.’ 0.1 ‘ ’ 1

(Dispersion parameter for quasipoisson family taken to be 8.774501)

    Null deviance: 6064.97  on 31  degrees of freedom
Residual deviance:  184.72  on 21  degrees of freedom
AIC: NA

Number of Fisher Scoring iterations: 4

Written by statcompute

December 8, 2015 at 11:16 pm

Are These Losses from The Same Distribution?

In Advanced Measurement Approaches (AMA) for Operational Risk models, the bank needs to segment operational losses into homogeneous segments known as “Unit of Measures (UoM)”, which are often defined by the combination of lines of business (LOB) and Basel II event types. However, how do we support whether the losses in one UoM are statistically different from the ones in another UoM? The answer is to test if the losses from various UoMs are distributionally different or equivalent.

Empirically, Kolmogorov-Smirnov (K-S) test is often used to test if two samples are from the same distribution. In the example below, although x and y share the same mean, K-S test still shows a significant result due to different variances.

n <- 300
set.seed(2015)
x <- rnorm(n, 0, 1)
y <- rnorm(n, 0, 1.5)

### 2-SAMPLE DISTRIBUTIONAL COMPARISON ###
ks.test(x, y, alternative = "two.sided")
#         Two-sample Kolmogorov-Smirnov test
#
# data:  x and y
# D = 0.1567, p-value = 0.001268
# alternative hypothesis: two-sided

However, K-S test cannot be generalized to K-sample cases, where K > 2. In such scenario, the univariate coverage test or the more general multivariate MRPP test might be more appropriate. The Blossom package developed by Talbert and Cade (https://www.fort.usgs.gov/products/23735) provides convenient functions implementing both tests, as shown below.

z <- rnorm(n, 0, 2)
df <- data.frame(x = c(x, y, z), g = unlist(lapply(c(1, 2, 3), rep, n)))

### K-SAMPLE DISTRIBUTIONAL COMPARISON ###
# COVERAGE TEST FOR THE UNIVARIATE RESPONSES
library(Blossom)
ctest <- coverage(df$x, df$g)
summary(ctest)
# Results:
#        Observed coverage statistic             :  1.870273
#        Mean of coverage statistic              :  1.774817
#        Estimated variance of coverage statistic:  0.002275862
#        Standard deviation of the variance
#         of the coverage statistic              :  5.108031e-05
#
#        Observed standardized coverage statistic:  2.00093
#        Skewness of observed coverage statistic :  0.08127759
#        Probability (Pearson Type III)
#        of a larger or equal coverage statistic :  0.02484709
#        Probability (Resampled)
#        of a largeror equal coverage statistic  :  0.02475*

# MULTIRESPONSE PERMUTATION PROCEDURE FOR MULTIVARIATE RESPONSES
mtest <- mrpp(x, g, df)
summary(mtest)
# Results:
#        Delta Observed                :  1.676303
#        Delta Expected                :  1.708194
#        Delta Variance                :  4.262303e-06
#        Delta Skewness                :  -1.671773
#
#        Standardized test statistic   :  -15.44685
#        Probability (Pearson Type III)
#        of a smaller or equal delta   :  9.433116e-09***

Written by statcompute

June 14, 2015 at 11:48 am