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I can calculate the motion of heavenly bodies but not the madness of people. -Isaac Newton

Posts Tagged ‘H2O

Sparkling Water and Moving Data Around

Sparkling Water is an application to integrate H2O with Spark. Below is an example showing how to move the data around among Pandas DataFrame, H2OFrame, and Spark Dataframe.

1. Define Context

In [1]: from pandas import read_csv, DataFrame

In [2]: from pyspark import sql

In [3]: from pysparkling import H2OContext

In [4]: from h2o import import_file, H2OFrame

In [5]: ss = sql.SparkSession.builder.getOrCreate()

In [6]: hc = H2OContext.getOrCreate(ss)

2. Convert Pandas Dataframe to H2OFrame and Spark DataFrame

In [7]: p_df = read_csv("Documents/credit_count.txt")

In [8]: type(p_df)
Out[8]: pandas.core.frame.DataFrame

In [9]: p2s_df = ss.createDataFrame(p_df)

In [10]: type(p2s_df)
Out[10]: pyspark.sql.dataframe.DataFrame

In [11]: p2h_df = H2OFrame(p_df)

In [12]: type(p2h_df)
Out[12]: h2o.frame.H2OFrame

3. Convert Spark Dataframe to H2OFrame and Pandas DataFrame

In [13]: s_df = ss.read.csv("Documents/credit_count.txt", header = True, inferSchema = True)

In [14]: type(s_df)
Out[14]: pyspark.sql.dataframe.DataFrame

In [15]: s2p_df = s_df.toPandas()

In [16]: type(s2p_df)
Out[16]: pandas.core.frame.DataFrame

In [17]: s2h_df = hc.as_h2o_frame(s_df)

In [18]: type(s2h_df)
Out[18]: h2o.frame.H2OFrame

4. Convert H2OFrame to Pandas Dataframe and Spark DataFrame

In [19]: h_df = import_file("Documents/credit_count.txt", header = 1, sep = ",")

In [20]: type(h_df)
Out[20]: h2o.frame.H2OFrame

In [21]: h2p_df = h_df.as_data_frame()

In [22]: type(h2p_df)
Out[22]: pandas.core.frame.DataFrame

In [23]: h2s_df = hc.as_spark_frame(h_df)

In [24]: type(h2s_df)
Out[24]: pyspark.sql.dataframe.DataFrame

Written by statcompute

July 3, 2017 at 12:36 am

GLM with H2O in R

Below is an example showing how to fit a Generalized Linear Model with H2O in R. The output is much more comprehensive than the one generated by the generic R glm().

> library(h2o)

> h2o.init(max_mem_size = "12g")

> df1 <- h2o.uploadFile("Documents/credit_count.txt", header = TRUE, sep = ",", parse_type = "CSV")

> df2 <- h2o.assign(df1[df1$CARDHLDR == 1, ], "glm_df")

> h2o.colnames(df2)
 [1] "CARDHLDR" "DEFAULT"  "AGE"      "ACADMOS"  "ADEPCNT"  "MAJORDRG"
 [7] "MINORDRG" "OWNRENT"  "INCOME"   "SELFEMPL" "INCPER"   "EXP_INC"
[13] "SPENDING" "LOGSPEND"

> Y <- "DEFAULT"

> X <- c("MAJORDRG", "MINORDRG", "INCOME", "OWNRENT")

> dist <- "binomial"

> link <- "logit"

> id <- "h2o_mdl01"

> mdl <- h2o.glm(X, Y, training_frame = h2o.getFrame("glm_df"), model_id = id, family = dist, link = link, lambda = 0, compute_p_values = TRUE, standardize = FALSE)

> show(h2o.getModel(id)@model$coefficients_table)
Coefficients: glm coefficients
      names coefficients std_error    z_value  p_value
1 Intercept    -1.204439  0.090811 -13.263121 0.000000
2  MAJORDRG     0.203135  0.069250   2.933370 0.003353
3  MINORDRG     0.202727  0.047971   4.226014 0.000024
4   OWNRENT    -0.201223  0.071619  -2.809636 0.004960
5    INCOME    -0.000442  0.000040 -10.942350 0.000000

> h2o.performance(h2o.getModel(id))
H2OBinomialMetrics: glm
** Reported on training data. **

MSE:  0.08414496
RMSE:  0.2900775
LogLoss:  0.3036585
Mean Per-Class Error:  0.410972
AUC:  0.6432189
Gini:  0.2864378
R^2:  0.02005004
Residual Deviance:  6376.221
AIC:  6386.221

Confusion Matrix (vertical: actual; across: predicted) for F1-optimal threshold:
          0    1    Error         Rate
0      7703 1800 0.189414   =1800/9503
1       630  366 0.632530     =630/996
Totals 8333 2166 0.231451  =2430/10499

Maximum Metrics: Maximum metrics at their respective thresholds
                        metric threshold    value idx
1                       max f1  0.126755 0.231499 142
2                       max f2  0.075073 0.376556 272
3                 max f0point5  0.138125 0.191828 115
4                 max accuracy  0.368431 0.905039   0
5                max precision  0.314224 0.250000   3
6                   max recall  0.006115 1.000000 399
7              max specificity  0.368431 0.999895   0
8             max absolute_mcc  0.126755 0.128940 142
9   max min_per_class_accuracy  0.106204 0.604546 196
10 max mean_per_class_accuracy  0.103730 0.605663 202

Written by statcompute

June 28, 2017 at 12:25 am

H2O Benchmark for CSV Import

The importFile() function in H2O is extremely efficient due to the parallel reading. The benchmark comparison below shows that it is comparable to the read.df() in SparkR and significantly faster than the generic read.csv().

library(SparkR, lib.loc = paste(Sys.getenv("SPARK_HOME"), "/R/lib", sep = ""))
sc <- sparkR.session(master = "local", sparkConfig = list(spark.driver.memory = "10g", spark.driver.cores = "4"))

library(h2o)
h2o.init(max_mem_size = "10g")

library(rbenchmark)

benchmark(replications = 5, order = "elapsed", relative = "elapsed",
   csv = {
          df <- read.csv("Documents/nycflights13.csv")
          print(nrow(df))
          rm(df)
         },
   spk = {
          df <- read.df("Documents/nycflights13.csv", source = "csv", header = "true", inferSchema = "true")
          print(nrow(df))
          rm(df)
         },
   h2o = {
          df <- h2o.importFile(path = "Documents/nycflights13.csv", header = TRUE, sep = ",")
          print(nrow(df))
          rm(df)
         }
 )

#   test replications elapsed relative user.self sys.self user.child sys.child
# 3  h2o            5   8.221    1.000     0.508    0.032          0         0
# 2  spk            5   9.822    1.195     0.008    0.004          0         0
# 1  csv            5  16.595    2.019    16.420    0.176          0         0

Written by statcompute

June 26, 2017 at 1:24 am

Posted in Big Data, H2O, S+/R, Spark

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