Yet Another Blog in Statistical Computing

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Posts Tagged ‘Boosting

DART: Dropout Regularization in Boosting Ensembles

The dropout approach developed by Hinton has been widely employed in deep learnings to prevent the deep neural network from overfitting, as shown in https://statcompute.wordpress.com/2017/01/02/dropout-regularization-in-deep-neural-networks.

In the paper http://proceedings.mlr.press/v38/korlakaivinayak15.pdf, the dropout can also be used to address the overfitting in boosting tree ensembles, e.g. MART, caused by the so-called “over-specialization”. In particular, while first few trees added at the beginning of ensembles would dominate the model performance, the rest added later can only improve the prediction for a small subset, which increases the risk of overfitting. The idea of DART is to build an ensemble by randomly dropping boosting tree members. The percentage of dropouts can determine the degree of regularization for boosting tree ensembles.

Below is a demonstration showing the implementation of DART with the R xgboost package. First of all, after importing the data, we divided it into two pieces, one for training and the other for testing.

pkgs <- c('pROC', 'xgboost')
lapply(pkgs, require, character.only = T)
df1 <- read.csv("Downloads/credit_count.txt")
df2 <- df1[df1$CARDHLDR == 1, ]
set.seed(2017)
n <- nrow(df2)
sample <- sample(seq(n), size = n / 2, replace = FALSE)
train <- df2[sample, -1]
test <- df2[-sample, -1]

For the comparison purpose, we first developed a boosting tree ensemble without dropouts, as shown below. For the simplicity, all parameters were chosen heuristically. The max_depth is set to 3 due to the fact that the boosting tends to work well with so-called “weak” learners, e.g. simple trees. While ROC for the training set can be as high as 0.95, ROC for the testing set is only 0.60 in our case, implying the overfitting issue.

mart.parm <- list(booster = "gbtree", nthread = 4, eta = 0.1, max_depth = 3, subsample = 1, eval_metric = "auc")
mart <- xgboost(data = as.matrix(train[, -1]), label = train[, 1], params = mart.parm, nrounds = 500, verbose = 0, seed = 2017)
pred1 <- predict(mart, as.matrix(train[, -1]))
pred2 <- predict(mart, as.matrix(test[, -1]))
roc(as.factor(train$DEFAULT), pred1)
# Area under the curve: 0.9459
roc(as.factor(test$DEFAULT), pred2)
# Area under the curve: 0.6046

With the same set of parameters, we refitted the ensemble with dropouts, e.g. DART. As shown below, by dropping 10% tree members, ROC for the testing set can increase from 0.60 to 0.65. In addition, the performance disparity between training and testing sets with DART decreases significantly.

dart.parm <- list(booster = "dart", rate_drop = 0.1, nthread = 4, eta = 0.1, max_depth = 3, subsample = 1, eval_metric = "auc")
dart <- xgboost(data = as.matrix(train[, -1]), label = train[, 1], params = dart.parm, nrounds = 500, verbose = 0, seed = 2017)
pred1 <- predict(dart, as.matrix(train[, -1]))
pred2 <- predict(dart, as.matrix(test[, -1]))
roc(as.factor(train$DEFAULT), pred1)
# Area under the curve: 0.7734
roc(as.factor(test$DEFAULT), pred2)
# Area under the curve: 0.6517

Besides rate_drop = 0.1, a wide range of dropout rates have also been tested. In most cases, DART outperforms its counterpart without the dropout regularization.

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Written by statcompute

August 20, 2017 at 5:50 pm

Where Bagging Might Work Better Than Boosting

In the previous post (https://statcompute.wordpress.com/2016/01/01/the-power-of-decision-stumps), it was shown that the boosting algorithm performs extremely well even with a simple 1-level stump as the base learner and provides a better performance lift than the bagging algorithm does. However, this observation shouldn’t be generalized, which would be demonstrated in the following example.

First of all, we developed a rule-based PART model as below. Albeit pruned, this model will still tend to over-fit the data, as shown in the highlighted.

# R = TRUE AND N = 10 FOR 10-FOLD CV PRUNING
# M = 5 SPECIFYING MINIMUM NUMBER OF CASES PER LEAF
part_control <- Weka_control(R = TRUE, N = 10, M = 5, Q = 2016)
part <- PART(fml, data = df, control = part_control)
roc(as.factor(train$DEFAULT), predict(part, newdata = train, type = "probability")[, 2])
# Area under the curve: 0.6839
roc(as.factor(test$DEFAULT), predict(part, newdata = test, type = "probability")[, 2])
# Area under the curve: 0.6082

Next, we applied the boosting to the PART model. As shown in the highlighted result below, AUC of the boosting on the testing data is even lower than AUC of the base model.

wlist <- list(PART, R = TRUE, N = 10, M = 5, Q = 2016)
# I = 100 SPECIFYING NUMBER OF ITERATIONS
# Q = TRUE SPECIFYING RESAMPLING USED IN THE BOOSTING
boost_control <- Weka_control(I = 100, S = 2016, Q = TRUE, P = 100, W = wlist)
boosting <- AdaBoostM1(fml, data = train, control = boost_control)
roc(as.factor(test$DEFAULT), predict(boosting, newdata = test, type = "probability")[, 2])
# Area under the curve: 0.592

However, if employing the bagging, we are able to achieve more than 11% performance lift in terms of AUC.

# NUM-SLOTS = 0 AND I = 100 FOR PARALLELISM 
# P = 50 SPECIFYING THE SIZE OF EACH BAG
bag_control <- Weka_control("num-slots" = 0, I = 100, S = 2016, P = 50, W = wlist)
bagging <- Bagging(fml, data = train, control = bag_control)
roc(as.factor(test$DEFAULT), predict(bagging, newdata = test, type = "probability")[, 2])
# Area under the curve: 0.6778

From examples demonstrated today and yesterday, an important lesson to learn is that ensemble methods are powerful machine learning tools only when they are used appropriately. Empirically speaking, while the boosting works well to improve the performance of a under-fitted base model such as the decision stump, the bagging might be able to perform better in the case of an over-fitted base model with high variance and low bias.

Written by statcompute

January 2, 2016 at 11:23 pm